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Yellow-eyed penguins could disappear from mainland – In the News

Sarah-Jane O'Connor posted in on May 17th, 2017.

One of New Zealand’s iconic species, the yellow-eyed penguin or hoiho, could disappear from the mainland within decades unless there is urgent action taken to protect the remaining population. Researchers from the University of Otago sounded the alarm after modelling suggested the South Island population could become locally extinct by 2060. But even that estimate […]

De-extinction: Sci-Fi or reality? – In the News

Tessa Evans posted in on May 10th, 2017.

New Zealand scientists have cemented their role at the forefront of discussions around de-extinctions with a leading role in a special journal issue on the topic.  University of Otago’s Professor Philip Seddon guest-edited the special issue of Functional Ecology, published this week, which included contributions from other New Zealand scientists, including University of Canterbury conservation […]

Otago researchers take control of atoms – In the News

Sarah-Jane O'Connor posted in on March 9th, 2017.

Physicists at the University of Otago have found a way to control individual atoms, making them appear wherever they command. The research, led by Dr Mikkel Andersen from the Dodd-Walls Centre, follows a breakthrough in 2010 when the team isolated and captured a neutral rubidium-85 atom, which allowed them to photograph it for the first time. […]

Rabbit virus might be released in Otago – In the News

Sarah-Jane O'Connor posted in on February 15th, 2017.

The Otago Regional Council has approved funding for the potential release of a virus to target the region’s rabbits. Update: The EPA has decided that the new product does not require regulation under the HSNO Act. The K5 virus is a variant of the rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHFV1) strain already in New Zealand. The virus […]

Lifestyle changes could cut bowel cancer burden – In the News

Sarah-Jane O'Connor posted in on December 16th, 2016.

Targeting six lifestyle factors could considerably reduce bowel cancer rates, according to a new study investigating risk factors for the disease. Published today in the New Zealand Medical Journal, the study examined the bowel cancer risk factors associated with obesity, alcohol consumption, smoking and consuming red and processed meat – plus the benefits associated with […]

Earthquake effect on tourism – Expert Q&A

Sarah-Jane O'Connor posted in on November 15th, 2016.

Over the coming days and weeks the full impact of Monday morning’s Kaikoura earthquake will become apparent. We asked an expert in the effect of natural disasters on tourism what the recovery of this tourist town might look like. Dr Caroline Orchiston, Deputy Director, Centre for Sustainability, University of Otago How do natural disasters like […]

Waikato proposes new medical school – In the News

Sarah-Jane O'Connor posted in on October 19th, 2016.

A third medical school, based in Waikato, has been proposed as a joint initiative between the University of Waikato and the Waikato District Health Board. But the plan has drawn ire from the country’s two existing medical schools. The proposed Waikato Medical School would take a community-focused approach, the University of Waikato said in a […]

Otago scientists make cervical cancer discovery – In the News

Sarah-Jane O'Connor posted in on October 7th, 2016.

Researchers at the University of Otago have made new gains in learning about one of the main viruses that causes cervical cancer and say their findings could lead to new therapies. The team, led by Associate Professor Merilyn Hibma, found a protein called E7 could play a key role in suppressing the body’s immune response […]

Study finds more adverse outcomes for midwife-led pregnancies – In the News

Sarah-Jane O'Connor posted in on September 28th, 2016.

New research from the University of Otago has found an excess of adverse outcomes for midwife-led compared to medically-led deliveries. The five-year study, published in PLOS Medicine, found mothers with medical-led care had lower odds of some adverse outcomes for their children, including oxygen deprivation, neonatal encephalopathy and a low Apgar score. New Zealand College […]

Changes to cervical cancer screening – Expert Reaction

Sarah-Jane O'Connor posted in on September 14th, 2016.

From 2018, women will begin cervical screening at age 25 – instead of 20 – based on evidence that suggests screening younger women does more harm than good. The Ministry of Health announced the change today, with clinical director of the National Screening Unit Dr Jane O’Hallahan saying the human papillomavirus (HPV) causes more than 90 […]

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