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Reflections On Science:

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Reflections On Science

Who’s reporting science-related issues in New Zealand?

Posted in Reflections On Science on October 20th, 2016.

New Zealand has some fine science and environment reporters reporting for print, television and radio. Based all over the country, from Auckland to Wellington to Christchurch, they help to ensure that New Zealanders are kept up to date with science and environment issues both here and abroad. The Science Media Centre approached some of them, […]

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The clock is ticking on our carbon budget – Jonathan Boston

Now that the Government has ratified the Paris Agreement, the clock is ticking on action to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, writes Victoria University Professor of Public Policy Jonathan Boston on An excerpt (read in full): Imagine allocating the remaining global carbon budget of about 260 billion tonnes on a per capita basis. New […]

October 11th, 2016 Read full Story

Welcome to the age of the Anthropocene – Tim Naish

Is the “Anthropocene” an exercise in geological bureaucracy or something socially more significant – Victoria University’s Professor Tim Naish writes in Fairfax’s science page – Catalyst. An excerpt (read in full): Welcome to the age of the “Anthropocene”. This is to be known as the period of geological history in which human activities left an […]

September 26th, 2016 Read full Story

Conservation in the Anthropocene Age – David Hall

There are shadows hanging over Conservation Week, writes policy researcher David Hall, the biggest one caused by the scale of humanity’s effect on the natural world. An excerpt (read in full): Last month the Anthropocene Working Group voted to acknowledge that a new geological epoch began around the time of ‘the Great Acceleration’ in the […]

September 16th, 2016 Read full Story

Myths no help to struggling sea lions – Jim Roberts

Myths about sea lions, sparked by a consultation paper out for public comment, are counterproductive to the conservation of the species, writes Niwa fisheries scientist Dr Jim Roberts. An excerpt (read in full…) Myth – NZ sea lions mainly eat squid Southern arrow squid make up less than one-fifth of their diet. Furthermore, survival and […]

September 12th, 2016 Read full Story

The dark side of co-sleeping – Chief Coroner Judge Deborah Marshall

The key to reducing cot deaths due to co-sleeping is educating and equipping families so they can provide a safe sleeping environment for their children, writes Chief Coroner Judge Deborah Marshall at An excerpt (read in full): There has been some concern surrounding the lack of evidence-based research into the risks of co-sleeping. Coroners […]

September 8th, 2016 Read full Story

GeoNet changed NZ earthquake science dramatically – Helen Anderson

Cantabrians have former seismologist Dr Helen Anderson’s vote for the world’s best citizen seismologists, she writes in Fairfax’s science page, Catalyst. An excerpt (read in full): Before [GeoNet], seismologists like me only knew an earthquake had occurred when the “drum” needles started shaking and the telephone for the seismological observatory became jammed with calls. For […]

August 29th, 2016 Read full Story

Time to flush out truth – Iain Rabbitts

Supplying un-chlorinated water is like driving without a seatbelt, writes water treatment engineer Iain Rabbitts in the NZ Herald, it’s not longer safe – if it ever was. An excerpt (read in full): It wasn’t safe to drive a car then without seatbelts but people had been doing it for over 35 years – why […]

August 25th, 2016 Read full Story

Next Olympic event: Improving faster than rivals – Mark Orams

As New Zealand’s Olympic athletes return with the most successful medal haul to date, AUT’s Professor Mark Orams writes in the NZ Herald about what it would take to improve for the next Games. An excerpt (read in full): Interestingly New Zealand’s most successful sporting code at the Rio Olympics, in medals won, was sailing. […]

August 24th, 2016 Read full Story

Universities succeed when they produce thoughtful leaders, not technocrats – Gareth Jones

The place of humanities in a university raises issues that extend far beyond a single department, argues Emeritus Professor Gareth Jones in the Otago Daily Times. An excerpt (read in full): We need lawyers who understand biomedical science or elements of commerce; we need doctors who have an appreciation of the medical humanities, let alone […]

August 17th, 2016 Read full Story

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